PHP 5.6.0 released

mysqli_stmt::bind_result

mysqli_stmt_bind_result

(PHP 5)

mysqli_stmt::bind_result -- mysqli_stmt_bind_resultBinds variables to a prepared statement for result storage

Description

Object oriented style

bool mysqli_stmt::bind_result ( mixed &$var1 [, mixed &$... ] )

Procedural style

bool mysqli_stmt_bind_result ( mysqli_stmt $stmt , mixed &$var1 [, mixed &$... ] )

Binds columns in the result set to variables.

When mysqli_stmt_fetch() is called to fetch data, the MySQL client/server protocol places the data for the bound columns into the specified variables var1, ....

Note:

Note that all columns must be bound after mysqli_stmt_execute() and prior to calling mysqli_stmt_fetch(). Depending on column types bound variables can silently change to the corresponding PHP type.

A column can be bound or rebound at any time, even after a result set has been partially retrieved. The new binding takes effect the next time mysqli_stmt_fetch() is called.

Parameters

stmt

Procedural style only: A statement identifier returned by mysqli_stmt_init().

var1

The variable to be bound.

Return Values

Returns TRUE on success or FALSE on failure.

Examples

Example #1 Object oriented style

<?php
$mysqli 
= new mysqli("localhost""my_user""my_password""world");

if (
mysqli_connect_errno()) {
    
printf("Connect failed: %s\n"mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}

/* prepare statement */
if ($stmt $mysqli->prepare("SELECT Code, Name FROM Country ORDER BY Name LIMIT 5")) {
    
$stmt->execute();

    
/* bind variables to prepared statement */
    
$stmt->bind_result($col1$col2);

    
/* fetch values */
    
while ($stmt->fetch()) {
        
printf("%s %s\n"$col1$col2);
    }

    
/* close statement */
    
$stmt->close();
}
/* close connection */
$mysqli->close();

?>

Example #2 Procedural style

<?php
$link 
mysqli_connect("localhost""my_user""my_password""world");

/* check connection */
if (!$link) {
    
printf("Connect failed: %s\n"mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}

/* prepare statement */
if ($stmt mysqli_prepare($link"SELECT Code, Name FROM Country ORDER BY Name LIMIT 5")) {
    
mysqli_stmt_execute($stmt);

    
/* bind variables to prepared statement */
    
mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt$col1$col2);

    
/* fetch values */
    
while (mysqli_stmt_fetch($stmt)) {
        
printf("%s %s\n"$col1$col2);
    }

    
/* close statement */
    
mysqli_stmt_close($stmt);
}

/* close connection */
mysqli_close($link);
?>

The above examples will output:

AFG Afghanistan
ALB Albania
DZA Algeria
ASM American Samoa
AND Andorra

See Also

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 15 notes

up
17
nieprzeklinaj at gmail dot com
3 years ago
I wrote a function that fetches all rows from a result set - either normal or prepared.

<?php
function fetch($result)
{   
   
$array = array();
   
    if(
$result instanceof mysqli_stmt)
    {
       
$result->store_result();
       
       
$variables = array();
       
$data = array();
       
$meta = $result->result_metadata();
       
        while(
$field = $meta->fetch_field())
           
$variables[] = &$data[$field->name]; // pass by reference
       
       
call_user_func_array(array($result, 'bind_result'), $variables);
       
       
$i=0;
        while(
$result->fetch())
        {
           
$array[$i] = array();
            foreach(
$data as $k=>$v)
               
$array[$i][$k] = $v;
           
$i++;
           
           
// don't know why, but when I tried $array[] = $data, I got the same one result in all rows
       
}
    }
    elseif(
$result instanceof mysqli_result)
    {
        while(
$row = $result->fetch_assoc())
           
$array[] = $row;
    }
   
    return
$array;
}
?>

Simply call it passing a result set or executed statement and you'll get all rows fetched.
up
15
hamidhossain at gmail dot com
5 years ago
lot of people don't like how bind_result works with prepared statements! it requires you to pass long list of parameters which will be loaded with column value when the function being called.

To solve this, i used call_user_func_array function and result_metadata functions. which make easy and automatically returns an array of all columns results stored in an array with column names.

please don't forget to change setting variables with your own credentials:

<?php
$host
= 'localhost';
$user = 'root';
$pass = '1234';
$data = 'test';

$mysqli = new mysqli($host, $user, $pass, $data);
/* check connection */
if (mysqli_connect_errno()) {
   
printf("Connect failed: %s\n", mysqli_connect_error());
    exit();
}

if (
$stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT * FROM sample WHERE t2 LIKE ?")) {
   
$tt2 = '%';
   
   
$stmt->bind_param("s", $tt2);
   
$stmt->execute();

   
$meta = $stmt->result_metadata();
    while (
$field = $meta->fetch_field())
    {
       
$params[] = &$row[$field->name];
    }

   
call_user_func_array(array($stmt, 'bind_result'), $params);

    while (
$stmt->fetch()) {
        foreach(
$row as $key => $val)
        {
           
$c[$key] = $val;
        }
       
$result[] = $c;
    }
   
   
$stmt->close();
}
$mysqli->close();
print_r($result);
?>
up
5
andrey at php dot net
8 years ago
If you select LOBs use the following order of execution or you risk mysqli allocating more memory that actually used

1)prepare()
2)execute()
3)store_result()
4)bind_result()

If you skip 3) or exchange 3) and 4) then mysqli will allocate memory for the maximal length of the column which is 255 for tinyblob, 64k for blob(still ok), 16MByte for MEDIUMBLOB - quite a lot and 4G for LONGBLOB (good if you have so much memory). Queries which use this order a bit slower when there is a LOB but this is the price of not having memory exhaustion in seconds.
up
5
uramihsayibok, gmail, com
5 years ago
A note to people to want to return an array of results - that is, an array of all the results from the query, not just one at a time.

<?php

// blah blah...
call_user_func_array(array($mysqli_stmt_object, "bind_result"), $byref_array_for_fields);

$results = array();
while (
$mysqli_stmt_object->fetch()) {
   
$results[] = $byref_array_for_fields;
}

?>
This will NOT work. $results will have a bunch of arrays, but each one will have a reference to $byref.

PHP is optimizing performance here: you aren't so much copying the $byref array into $results as you are *adding* it. That means $results will have a bunch of $byrefs - the same array repeated multiple times. (So what you see is that $results is all duplicates of the last item from the query.)

hamidhossain (01-Sep-2008) shows how to get around that: inside the loop that fetches results you also have to loop through the list of fields, copying them as you go. In effect, copying everything individually.

Personally, I'd rather use some kind of function that effectively duplicates an array than write my own code. Many of the built-in array functions don't work, apparently using references rather than copies, but a combination of array_map and create_function does.

<?php

// blah blah...
call_user_func_array(array($mysqli_stmt_object, "bind_result"), $byref_array_for_fields);

// returns a copy of a value
$copy = create_function('$a', 'return $a;');

$results = array();
while (
$mysqli_stmt_object->fetch()) {
   
// array_map will preserve keys when done here and this way
   
$results[] = array_map($copy, $byref_array_for_fields);
}

?>

All these problems would go away if they just implemented a fetch_assoc or even fetch_array for prepared statements...
up
7
timchampion dot NOSPAM at gmail dot com
2 years ago
Just wanted to make sure that all were aware of get_result for those needing the result in array format.

In the code sample, after execute(), perform a get_result() like this:

<?php

// ... this document's example code:

   
$stmt->execute();

   
/* instead of bind_result: */
   
$result = $stmt->get_result();

   
/* now you can fetch the results into an array - NICE */
   
while ($myrow = $result->fetch_assoc()) {
       
printf("%s %s\n", $myrow['Code'], $myrow['Name']);
    }

?>

This is much nicer when you have a dozen or more fields coming back from your query.  Hope this helps.  Also, as noted in the comments for get_result, it requires mysqlnd.
up
1
quano
3 years ago
If I have a longtext field in the result, the whole page will go blank, without giving me any errors what so ever. This is because PHP _crashes_. I've spent an entire morning figuring this out.

Apparently, if you have longtext present, you HAVE to call store_result before using bind_result.

http://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=47928
up
1
Miguel Hatrick
5 years ago
Took some cool code from here and made a little class for those object oriented kind of guys

used like this:

<?php
// execute prepared statement
$stmt->execute();
$stmt->store_result();
           
//custom class :D bind to Statement Result mambo jambo!
$sr = new Statement_Result($stmt);
           
$stmt->fetch();
printf("ID: %d\n", $sr->Get('id') );

/////////////////////////////////

class Statement_Result
{
    private
$_bindVarsArray = array();
    private
$_results = array();

    public function
__construct(&$stmt)
    {
       
$meta = $stmt->result_metadata();

        while (
$columnName = $meta->fetch_field())
           
$this->_bindVarsArray[] = &$this->_results[$columnName->name];

       
call_user_func_array(array($stmt, 'bind_result'), $this->_bindVarsArray);
       
       
$meta->close();
    }
   
    public function
Get_Array()
    {
        return
$this->_results;   
    }
   
    public function
Get($column_name)
    {
        return
$this->_results[$column_name];
    }
}
?>
up
0
dev+php at alepe dot com
3 years ago
According to the above documentation:
"Depending on column types bound variables can silently change to the corresponding PHP type. "

if you specify a field as int (tinyint, mediumint, etc.) with zerofill property, it will be converted (silently) to PHP integer (erasing the leading zeros). In order to keep those leading zeros, one solution is to specify the field as decimal.

Note that this only happens when using prepared statements and not when executing the query directly.
up
0
scragar at gmail dot com
3 years ago
To clarify for anyone having problems with arrays, PHP will automatically pass arrays as references, cloning the array if needed in the event of setting or unsetting a part of it, changing a referenced variable does not trigger cloning.

This is done for efficiency, to clone an array containing this information you may either use a foreach loop, or set/unset a key. Techniques like array_values will also work provided you don't mind losing your keys.
up
0
pcc at pccglobal dot com
4 years ago
If done properly, 'call_user_func_array()' works to bind variables to a result of multiple columns including BLOB columns.

EXAMPLE:

<?php
$data
= array() ; // Array that accepts the data.
$params = array() ; // Parameter array passed to 'bind_result()'
$column = array("fidentity", "fvarchar", "fdate", "ftinyblob") ; // The column names.
foreach($column as $col_name)
{
 
// 'fetch()' will assign fetched value to the variable '$data[$col_name]'
 
$params[] =& $data[$col_name] ;
}
$res = call_user_func_array(array($stmt, "bind_result"), $params) ;
?>

Here's the complete example.
WARNING: When using 'prepare' to prepare a statement to retrieve LOBs the method order matters.
Also, method 'store_result()' must be called and be called in correct order.
Failure to observe this causes PHP/MySQLi to crash or return an erroneous value.
The proper procedure order is: prepare -> execute -> store_result -> bind -> fetch

<?php
$database
= "test" ;
$table = "test" ;
$column = array("fidentity", "fvarchar", "fdate", "ftinyblob") ;
$select_set = "`fidentity`, `fvarchar`, `fdate`, `ftinyblob`" ;
$mysqli = new mysqli("localhost", "root", $password, $database);
// Proper procedure order: prepare -> execute -> store_result -> bind -> fetch
$stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT $select_set FROM `$table`") ;
$stmt->execute();
$stmt->store_result();
$data = array() ; // Array that accepts the data.
$params = array() ; // Parameter array passed to 'bind_result()'
foreach($column as $col_name)
{
 
// Assign the fetched value to the variable '$data[$name]'
 
$params[] =& $data[$col_name] ;
}
$res = call_user_func_array(array($stmt, "bind_result"), $params) ;
if(!
$res)
{
  echo
"bind_result() failed: " . $mysqli->error . "\n" ;
}
else
{
 
$res = $stmt->fetch() ;
  if(
$res)
  {
      echo
"<pre>" . htmlentities(print_r($data, true)) . "</pre>\n" ;
  }
  else
  {
    echo ((
false !== $res) ? "End of data" : $stmt->error) . "\n" ;
  }
}
$stmt->close() ;
$mysqli->close() ;
exit ;
?>

The above example should output:
Array (
  [fidentity] => 24
  [fvarchar] => the rain in spain
  [fdate] => 2010-07-31
  [ftinyblob] => GIF89a...(more BLOB data)
)
up
0
atulkashyap1 at hotmail dot com
5 years ago
bind_ result can also be used to return an array of variables from a function,
This took me a long time to figure out, so I would like to share this.

<?php
function extracting(){
 
$query="SELECT topic, detail, date, tags
    FROM updates
    ORDER BY date DESC
    LIMIT 5 "
;
  if(
$stmt = $this->conn->prepare($query)) {
   
$stmt->execute();
   
$stmt->bind_result($updates[0],$updates[1],$updates[2],$updates[3]);
   
$i=0;
    while(
$stmt->fetch()){
     
$i++;
     
$name='t'.$i;
      $
$name = array($updates[0],$updates[1],$updates[2],$updates[3]);
    }
    return array(
$t1,$t2,$t3,$t4,$t5,);
   
$stmt->close();
  }
}
?>
up
0
bb at servertje dot nl
6 years ago
Although inspired by an earlier post, this method could be added to any of your database objects. It's an object oriented implementation of an earlier post.

The method returns an array with objects representing a row. Each property represents a column and its value.

<?php
   
private function getresult($stmt)
    {
     
$result = array();
     
     
$metadata = $stmt->result_metadata();
     
$fields = $metadata->fetch_fields();

      for (;;)
      {
       
$pointers = array();
       
$row = new stdClass();
       
       
$pointers[] = $stmt;
        foreach (
$fields as $field)
        {
         
$fieldname = $field->name;
         
$pointers[] = &$row->$fieldname;
        }
       
       
call_user_func_array(mysqli_stmt_bind_result, $pointers);
       
        if (!
$stmt->fetch())
          break;
       
       
$result[] = $row;
      }
     
     
$metadata->free();
     
      return
$result;
    }
?>
up
0
thejkwhosaysni at gmail dot com
8 years ago
I've created these functions which will act like mysqli_fetch_array() and mysqli_fetch_object() but work with bound results.

<?php
   
function fetch_object() {
       
$data = mysqli_stmt_result_metadata($this->stmt);
       
$count = 1; //start the count from 1. First value has to be a reference to stmt.
       
$fieldnames[0] = &$this->stmt;
       
$obj = new stdClass;
        while (
$field = mysqli_fetch_field($data)) {
           
$fn = $field->name; //get all the feild names
           
$fieldnames[$count] = &$obj->$fn; //load the fieldnames into an object..
           
$count++;
        }
       
call_user_func_array(mysqli_stmt_bind_result, $fieldnames);
       
mysqli_stmt_fetch($this->stmt);
        return
$obj;
    }

    function
fetch_array() {
       
$data = mysqli_stmt_result_metadata($this->stmt);
       
$count = 1; //start the count from 1. First value has to be a reference to the stmt. because bind_param requires the link to $stmt as the first param.
       
$fieldnames[0] = &$this->stmt;
        while (
$field = mysqli_fetch_field($data)) {
           
$fieldnames[$count] = &$array[$field->name]; //load the fieldnames into an array.
           
$count++;
        }
       
call_user_func_array(mysqli_stmt_bind_result, $fieldnames);
       
mysqli_stmt_fetch($this->stmt);
        return
$array;

    }

?>

Hope this helps some people, I was puzzled by this for a while.
up
-1
swissbob2 at yahoo dot co dot uk
4 years ago
I discovered this one by accident; mysqli_stmt_bind_result overwrites an *existing* session variable of the same name (but doesn't create them).

In other words, 

    mysqli_stmt_bind_result($stmt, $col1, $col2);

will overwrite session variables $_SESSION['col1'] and $_SESSION['col2'] if they exist, but will not create them if they don't.
up
0
brad dot jackson at resiideo dot com
9 years ago
A potential problem exists in binding result parameters from a prepared statement which reference large datatypes like mediumblobs.  One of our database tables contains a table of binary image data.  Our largest image in this table is around 50Kb, but even so the column is typed as a mediumblob to allow for files larger than 64Kb.  I spent a frustrating hour trying to figure out why mysqli_stmt_bind_result choked while trying to allocate 16MB of memory for what should have been at most a 50Kb result, until I realized the function is checking the column type first to find out how big a result _might_ be retrieved, and attempting to allocate that much memory to contain it.  My solution was to use a more basic mysqli_result() query.  Another option might have been to retype the image data column as blob (64Kb limit).
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